All things Space
dedicated to the Opportunity Mars Rover and his deceased companion Spirit

theuniverseatlarge:

"Smoking Gun" - Evidence for Theory that Saturn’s Collapsing Magnetic Tail Causes Auroras

From Opli.com:

University of Leicester researchers have captured stunning images of Saturn’s auroras as the planet’s magnetic field is battered by charged particles from the Sun.

The team’s findings provide a “smoking gun” for the theory that Saturn’s auroral displays are often caused by the dramatic collapse of its “magnetic tail”.

Just like comets, planets such as Saturn and the Earth have a “tail” – known as the magnetotail – that is made up of electrified gas from the Sun and flows out in the planet’s wake.

When a particularly strong burst of particles from the Sun hits Saturn, it can cause the magnetotail to collapse, with the ensuing disturbance of the planet’s magnetic field resulting in spectacular auroral displays. A very similar process happens here on Earth.

Read More

Notes
20
Posted
5 days ago
spaceexp:

Cosmonauts completing a space walk last night on the International Space Station

spaceexp:

Cosmonauts completing a space walk last night on the International Space Station

Notes
112
Posted
6 days ago
theoneaboutscience:

Curiosity watched on sol 713 as lumpy Phobos passed across the face of the Sun. There are 84 images in this animation, which runs faster than natural speed. A couple of sunspots are faintly visible. The animation is composed of raw JPEG images, so contains artifacts, particularly at the high-contrast areas at the edges of the Sun and Phobos.
NASA / JPL / MSSS / TAMU / Emily Lakdawalla (via Curiosity sees a Phobos transit, sol 713 | The Planetary Society)

theoneaboutscience:

Curiosity watched on sol 713 as lumpy Phobos passed across the face of the Sun. There are 84 images in this animation, which runs faster than natural speed. A couple of sunspots are faintly visible. The animation is composed of raw JPEG images, so contains artifacts, particularly at the high-contrast areas at the edges of the Sun and Phobos.
NASA / JPL / MSSS / TAMU / Emily Lakdawalla (via Curiosity sees a Phobos transit, sol 713 | The Planetary Society)

Notes
510
Posted
6 days ago
distant-traveller:


25 years ago, Voyager 2 captures images of Neptune







NASA’s Voyager 2 spacecraft gave humanity its first glimpse of Neptune and its moon Triton in the summer of 1989. This picture of Neptune was produced from the last whole planet images taken through the green and orange filters on the Voyager 2 narrow angle camera. The images were taken on Aug. 20, 1989, at a range of 4.4 million miles from the planet, 4 days and 20 hours before closest approach on Aug. 25. The picture shows the Great Dark Spot and its companion bright smudge; on the west limb the fast moving bright feature called “Scooter” and the little dark spot are visible. These clouds were seen to persist for as long as Voyager’s cameras could resolve them. North of these, a bright cloud band similar to the south polar streak may be seen.
In the summer of 2015, another NASA mission to the farthest zone of the solar system, New Horizons, will make a historic first close-up study of Pluto. Although a fast flyby, New Horizons’ Pluto encounter on July 14, 2015, will not be a replay of Voyager but more of a sequel and a reboot, with a new and more technologically advanced spacecraft and, more importantly, a new cast of characters. Those characters are Pluto and its family of five known moons, all of which will be seen up close for the first time next summer.

Image credit: NASA

distant-traveller:

25 years ago, Voyager 2 captures images of Neptune

NASA’s Voyager 2 spacecraft gave humanity its first glimpse of Neptune and its moon Triton in the summer of 1989. This picture of Neptune was produced from the last whole planet images taken through the green and orange filters on the Voyager 2 narrow angle camera. The images were taken on Aug. 20, 1989, at a range of 4.4 million miles from the planet, 4 days and 20 hours before closest approach on Aug. 25. The picture shows the Great Dark Spot and its companion bright smudge; on the west limb the fast moving bright feature called “Scooter” and the little dark spot are visible. These clouds were seen to persist for as long as Voyager’s cameras could resolve them. North of these, a bright cloud band similar to the south polar streak may be seen.

In the summer of 2015, another NASA mission to the farthest zone of the solar system, New Horizons, will make a historic first close-up study of Pluto. Although a fast flyby, New Horizons’ Pluto encounter on July 14, 2015, will not be a replay of Voyager but more of a sequel and a reboot, with a new and more technologically advanced spacecraft and, more importantly, a new cast of characters. Those characters are Pluto and its family of five known moons, all of which will be seen up close for the first time next summer.

Image credit: NASA

(Source: nasa.gov)

Notes
229
Posted
6 days ago
humanoidhistory:

The Space Shuttle Discovery lifts off from Cape Canaveral on March 8, 2001.
(NASA)

humanoidhistory:

The Space Shuttle Discovery lifts off from Cape Canaveral on March 8, 2001.

(NASA)

Notes
300
Posted
6 days ago
distant-traveller:

Arp 188 and the Tadpole’s Tail

Why does this galaxy have such a long tail? In this stunning vista, based on image data from the Hubble Legacy Archive, distant galaxies form a dramatic backdrop for disrupted spiral galaxy Arp 188, the Tadpole Galaxy. The cosmic tadpole is a mere 420 million light-years distant toward the northern constellation Draco. Its eye-catching tail is about 280 thousand light-years long and features massive, bright blue star clusters. One story goes that a more compact intruder galaxy crossed in front of Arp 188 - from right to left in this view - and was slung around behind the Tadpole by their gravitational attraction. During the close encounter, tidal forces drew out the spiral galaxy’s stars, gas, and dust forming the spectacular tail. The intruder galaxy itself, estimated to lie about 300 thousand light-years behind the Tadpole, can be seen through foreground spiral arms at the upper right. Following its terrestrial namesake, the Tadpole Galaxy will likely lose its tail as it grows older, the tail’s star clusters forming smaller satellites of the large spiral galaxy.

Image credit: Hubble Legacy Archive, ESA, NASA; Processing & copyright: Joachim Dietrich

distant-traveller:

Arp 188 and the Tadpole’s Tail

Why does this galaxy have such a long tail? In this stunning vista, based on image data from the Hubble Legacy Archive, distant galaxies form a dramatic backdrop for disrupted spiral galaxy Arp 188, the Tadpole Galaxy. The cosmic tadpole is a mere 420 million light-years distant toward the northern constellation Draco. Its eye-catching tail is about 280 thousand light-years long and features massive, bright blue star clusters. One story goes that a more compact intruder galaxy crossed in front of Arp 188 - from right to left in this view - and was slung around behind the Tadpole by their gravitational attraction. During the close encounter, tidal forces drew out the spiral galaxy’s stars, gas, and dust forming the spectacular tail. The intruder galaxy itself, estimated to lie about 300 thousand light-years behind the Tadpole, can be seen through foreground spiral arms at the upper right. Following its terrestrial namesake, the Tadpole Galaxy will likely lose its tail as it grows older, the tail’s star clusters forming smaller satellites of the large spiral galaxy.

Image credit: Hubble Legacy Archive, ESA, NASA; Processing & copyright: Joachim Dietrich

(Source: apod.nasa.gov, via aimlessinspace)

Notes
138
Posted
6 days ago

trigonometry-is-my-bitch:

Gravity wells - 

A Gravity well or gravitational well is defined as “a conceptual model of the gravitational field surrounding a body in space.”

The more massive the body, the deeper and more extensive the gravity well associated with it. The Sun is very massive, relative to other bodies in the Solar System, so its gravity well appears “deep” and far-reaching.

(picture a very heavy object sinking deep into a bed mattress; the more mass the object has the deeper it sinks in and creates a deeper sinkhole; a deeper sink hole will pull in any nearby objects towards the centre object with greater influence. Objects of  mass bend the fabric of spacetime this way also as the theory of general relativity explains) 

a video example

(via thenewenlightenmentage)

Notes
1369
Posted
6 days ago
space-pictures:

Light Echo From Star V838 Monocerotis
Credit: NASA, ESA and H.E. Bond (STScI)

space-pictures:

Light Echo From Star V838 Monocerotis

Credit: NASA, ESA and H.E. Bond (STScI)

(via entiredog)

Notes
720
Posted
6 days ago
ghosthomo:

photogenic-oatmeal:

I think I live in a fairy tale. 

it’s seeing things like this that make me appreciate the life i live

ghosthomo:

photogenic-oatmeal:

I think I live in a fairy tale. 

it’s seeing things like this that make me appreciate the life i live

(Source: rrachelinthewildd, via i-am-a-myth)

Notes
369758
Posted
6 days ago

scifigeneration:

55 Twitter photos from space that will fill you with ethereal wonder

Reid Wiseman is a national treasure.

Follow micdotcom

from this view, we don’t seem so savage.

(Source: micdotcom)

Notes
154703
Posted
6 days ago
mothernaturenetwork:

NASA probe may’ve picked up interstellar dust bunnies

The biggest of the particles weighed only a trillionths of a gram, and it would take a trillion of them to fill an entire teaspoon.

mothernaturenetwork:

NASA probe may’ve picked up interstellar dust bunnies

The biggest of the particles weighed only a trillionths of a gram, and it would take a trillion of them to fill an entire teaspoon.

Notes
88
Posted
2 weeks ago
thedemon-hauntedworld:

Tadpole galaxy Based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, and obtained from the Hubble Legacy Archive, which is a collaboration between the Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI/NASA), the Space Telescope European Coordinating Facility (ST-ECF/ESA) and the Canadian Astronomy Data Centre (CADC/NRC/CSA).
Credit: NASA, Hubble, Mehdi Bozzo-Rey

thedemon-hauntedworld:

Tadpole galaxy
Based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, and obtained from the Hubble Legacy Archive, which is a collaboration between the Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI/NASA), the Space Telescope European Coordinating Facility (ST-ECF/ESA) and the Canadian Astronomy Data Centre (CADC/NRC/CSA).

Credit: NASA, Hubble, Mehdi Bozzo-Rey

(via aastronaut)

Notes
414
Posted
2 weeks ago
spaceexp:

Alignment of Callisto and Europa, captured by the Cassini spacecraft in 2000

spaceexp:

Alignment of Callisto and Europa, captured by the Cassini spacecraft in 2000

Notes
974
Posted
2 weeks ago
spacewatching:

The Future of American Human Space Flight

spacewatching:

The Future of American Human Space Flight

(via hyperwave)

Notes
55
Posted
2 weeks ago
TotallyLayouts has Tumblr Themes, Twitter Backgrounds, Facebook Covers, Tumblr Music Player and Tumblr Follower Counter